The Bowery Presents
Gentlemen of the Road and Bowery Presents present: Mumford & Sons

Gentlemen of the Road and Bowery Presents present: Mumford & Sons

Dawes, Aaron Embry

Wed, August 1, 2012

Doors: 5:00 pm / Show: 6:30 pm

Pier A (Hoboken, NJ)

Hoboken, NJ

$55

Sold Out

This event is all ages


WFUV Presents

NO PUBLIC PARKING WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR THIS EVENT.
Click here for transportation options to and from Hoboken


Prohibited Items:
Weapons of any kind
Illegal Substances
Framed or Large Backpacks
Outside Food & Beverage, including Alcohol
Glass containers of ANY kind
Bicycles, Skateboards, Scooters or personal motorized vehicles
Fireworks and Explosives
Laser Pointers
Instruments
Blankets
Chairs or Lawn Furniture of any kind
Beach/Golf Umbrellas
Coolers or Picnic Baskets
Pets (except service dogs)
Video equipment - no video recording will be allowed
Professional still camera equipment (no detachable lenses, tripods, big zooms, or commercial use rigs)
Audio recording equipment
No illegal vending is permitted - no unauthorized/unlicensed vendors allowed

Rain or Shine

Mumford and Sons
Mumford and Sons
Since they formed in December 2007, the members of Mumford & Sons have shared a common purpose: to make music that matters, without taking themselves too seriously. Four young men from West London in their early twenties, they have fire in their bellies, romance in their hearts, and rapture in their masterful, melancholy voices. They are staunch friends - Marcus Mumford, Country Winston, Ben Lovett, and Ted Dwane - who bring their music to us with the passion and pride of an old-fashioned, much-cherished, family business. They create a gutsy, old-time sound that marries the magic of Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young with the might of Kings Of Leon, and their incredible energy draws us in quickly to their circle of songs, to the warmth of their stories, and to their magical community of misty-eyed men.

The four friends were playing various instruments in various bands in London throughout the summer of 2007. They were united to perform impromptu renditions of Marcus' earliest attempts at song-writing in front of crowds of friends in sweaty underground folk nights in the capital. They bonded over their love of country, bluegrass and folk, and decided to make music that sounded loud, proud and live - taking music that could often be pretty and delicate, and fill it with enthusiasm, courage and confidence. "It was a very exciting time, and though we loved it and were in awe of the music going on around us, we didn't consider ourselves contenders in the pretty daunting London music scene. There was never any idea of competition, just pure enjoyment", says Marcus. They loved live music so much that they would practise their sets on pavements outside the venues, and also act as backing musicians for the peers with whom they played.

This sense of playing music for the love of it has continued as the main theme through the band's short history. They booked their first rehearsals in the late autumn of 2007: "As soon as we sat down together, just the four of us, we knew we had become a band cos what came out was unique to us four as individuals," says Ben. Out of this session came their first band songs: Awake My Soul and White Blank Page, highlights on their debut album.

As soon as they had their first rough cluster of songs, they hit the road. Straightaway, they won the hearts of their audiences with their harmonies, the way they engaged with their instruments, their bandmates and their crowds - and chased the friendly live reception they got all over the country.

Word spread quickly. The band toured extensively throughout 2008; from a barge-tour of the Thames with eight other acts, through to an island-hopping tour of the Scottish highlands, and a triumphant set at Glastonbury in June, they sold out London's Luminaire in July, only half a year after they got together. Their first American tour followed in support of Laura Marling and Johnny Flynn and the Sussex Wit. A trilogy of beautiful 10" EPs all on Chess Club Records also followed, recorded simply at home. Their eponymous EP debuted the same month as their Luminaire show; Love Your Ground followed in December; while The Cave And The Open Sea arrived in May.

With each release, the music of Mumford & Sons got brighter, bolder and brawnier, with an increasing focus on their empassioned and intimate lyrics. "What we write about is real, and we sing and play our instruments more passionately cos we feel like we need to. We love honest music," says Winston.

Their success continued to build, too, with two glorious benchmarks being their place on the BBC Sound Of 2009 Poll shortlist, and their London ICA show selling out in 24 hours.

Then came the time to record their debut album - and then came the extraordinary producer who wanted to work with them. Markus Dravs recorded Arcade Fire's Neon Bible, Björk's Homogenic and The Maccabees' Wall of Arms, and he saw similar crossover potential in the Sons. He took them to the legendary Eastcote Studios where Arctic Monkeys, Brian Eno, Tindersticks and Laura Marling have honed their music on its vintage equipment; made the band buy good instruments; set them a daily routine; and encouraged them to try and work even more instinctively, to strengthen their already-powerful musical personality. "He wanted us just to sound like us", explains Ben. "He talked about us working on our music's most jubilant and melancholic moments, and make them even more evocative. And over those four weeks, everything came together."

The album begins with the extraordinary title track, Sigh No More, a statement of intent that references the romantic language of Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, as they sing: "Love it will not betray you, dismay or enslave you / It will set you free / Be more like the man you were made to be." Amongst darkly reflective tracks such as Thistle & Weeds and ballads like White Blank Page, Winter Winds and Roll Away Your Stone, by contrast, show the band's sprightlier side, the rollicking banjo of the former conjuring up stormy weather that "litters London with lonely hearts"; the latter a fabulous hoedown about a man unsuccessfully filling the hole in his soul.

As the album moves on, this fervour never dies. Little Lion Man - a track that Zane Lowe named the "Hottest Record In The World Today" on a recent Radio 1 show - is a rampage about regret and unresolved heartbreak: "Tremble, little lion man / You'll never settle any of your scores / Your grace is wasted in your face / Your boldness stands alone among the wreck". And finally, after a wild lashing out in the murderous fable of Dust Bowl Dance, After The Storm arrives, the only track Mumford and Sons wrote in the studio, away from the live stage they knew so well. It stands an incredibly moving final track to an incredibly moving album - the story of a man scared of what's behind and what's before, and creates a considered conclusion to the band's epic debut album.

Mumford & Sons' live reputation goes before them, and now their incredible debut reveals the extent of their magic and majesty on record. Feel the fire in your belly and the romance in your heart as you listen, let your voice break into rapture - and you too sigh no more.

Mumford & Sons are: Marcus Mumford, Country Winston, Ben Lovett, and Ted Dwane.
Dawes
Dawes
Dawes has come home. After recording its last two albums, Stories Don't End and All Your Favorite Bands, in Asheville, North Carolina, and Nashville, respectively, the Los Angeles band has returned to the city that has been both home and inspiration since its inception in 2009 to record its fifth album, We're All Gonna Die, with longtime friend and Grammy nominated producer Blake Mills at the helm.

Mills had been in bands with Dawes founder Taylor Goldsmith since they were in junior high together, but they hadn't worked on an entire project together since Mills left the band's early incarnation, Simon Dawes, in 2006 after the release of its well-regarded album Carnivore.

It was clear from the onset that home was much more than a physical place for Dawes. It was a state of mind. For the band-guitarist/singer Taylor Goldsmith, drummer Griffin Goldsmith (Taylor's younger brother), bassist Wylie Gelber, and new keyboardist Lee Pardini, who took over from Tay Strathairn last fall-it also meant getting to a point where everyone felt they had found a sound that was uniquely their own, equivalent to an author finding their own voice.

"The dream has been not to have someone say, 'You sound like Warren Zevon in this song or Bob Dylan with this song,' but where someone hears a first few notes of a track, even before the words come in, and they know it's Dawes," says Taylor Goldsmith. "And they say, 'That's Wylie, that's Griffin, that's Taylor, that's Lee. That's the way they play together.'"

"I think we've finally done that on this record." All of their records seemed to have been in service to getting to that point, each album willfully different, every one a point on a continuum. First, the acoustic-based folk-rock and close harmonies of North Hills that brought to mind nothing so much as the Band's Music From Big Pink. The cosmic country-rock of Nothing Is Wrong, an album that conjured up visions of Gram Parson's Nudie suits. The smart, wordy, Joan Didion-inspired Stories Don't End, then the literate, post-breakup yowl of All Your Favorite Bands, with its crisp lyrics and Dire Straits guitars, masterfully capturing their live genius in a way none of their other albums had.

"I think how we got here is our ambition level and discipline to be honest," explains Goldsmith. "When we worked with Dave Rawlings on All Your Favorite Bands, we were searching for a representation of what we did on the stage. Once we got that, we wanted to fuck with people's perceptions of us."

"From the first song I wrote, 'We're All Gonna Die,' it was clear that this wasn't going to be a folkie record at all. This was an opportunity for us to be a new band. Not just a rock band, not just an alternative band, but a new band. One that maintains all the weird personality traits that our other records might have had, but that also brings them out even more.

"With this record we went in thinking, 'How do we create something that's coming out of the speakers that forces someone to say, "What is that How did they do that"' There's sounds on 'We're All Gonna Die' or 'Roll With the Punches' where people are like, 'How did you get that guitar tone' It's not even a guitar," laughs Goldsmith.

It's something that fans hardly expect from Dawes, which has always bridged generations and genres, writing music you feel you already know, with a familiarity and a resonance that seemed to echo from earlier times in rock's great canon. It's one of the reason they have found great favor with classic rock artists such as John Fogerty, opening up for him, acting as backing band for Jackson Browne and Robbie Robertson, even appearing on Robertson's album How to Be Clairvoyant. In 2013, they opened for Bob Dylan for six weeks.

"I have to say Blake Mills has challenged me more than any producer I've ever worked with," says Goldsmith. "And that's a good thing. We can read each other's minds: The two of us learned music together, and we were sitting next to each other when we were in AP Theory class. It's like we have the exact same set of tools."

But those tools are used in astonishing ways on We're All Gonna Die, with Mills guiding Dawes into much deeper waters, crafting a record that is much more bass-heavy and keyboard-centric than any of their others, recalling some of the sonic explosions that Kanye West and Bon Iver have set off on their recent albums.

Mills has distorted Dawes' formerly pacific sounds by adding futuristic noises, anxious beats, an occasional island sensibility, and even the messed-up plunk of New Orleans-style piano on "As If Design," which attempts to solve one of life's bigger conundrums, amplifying one of Taylor Goldsmith's familiar themes of trying to figure out both arcane and pragmatic mysteries about life and love.

From the disorienting synth sound that kicks off the album's lead track, "One of Us," Dawes' paean to not fitting in, to the buzzy stutter of "Quitter," with its metaphysical uncertainties, to album stand-out"When the Tequila Runs Out," with its found and familiar sounds used in disconcerting and unnerving ways, as jarring as the debauched hipster party the protagonist attends, this is a new beast.

"I know it's not anything like All Your Favorite Bands, and I know it's much stranger, but in some ways it's much simpler," says Goldsmith.

Simpler in terms of winnowing down some of the lyrics, compressing the stories, saying less and meaning more, like the very best novelists. In fact, it would be fair to say that Goldsmith is perhaps more writer than he is musician-casting no aspersions on the multi-instrumentalist's musical acumen. We're All Gonna Die is dense with stories and brilliant, telling images that are more like movies than four-and-a-half-minute songs, all containing a moral, a proverb, advice or hope, like a scrap of paper tucked instead a Chinese fortune cookie, nudging listeners towards understanding, clarity, or at best, enlightenment.

"There's a difference between art that makes a suggestion and art just that's just disruptive. Anyone can pick up a guitar and say, 'She left me, I'm heartbroken.' That's going to do something to people in the audience. They're going to feel something. But if you leave it at that, they just feel stuck in the same place as you are. But if there is some sort of suggestion, like 'here's how I moved on and here's why it's okay,' then at least there's potential for a listener to feel empowered. That's what I try to do in my songs," says Goldsmith.

This time out, the songwriting responsibilities didn't fall only on Taylor Goldsmith's shoulders. Six of the album' songs were co-written with Blake Mills and two with Jason Boesel, Goldsmith's longtime friend and former member of Rilo Kiley. Mills and Boesel also wrote one together, "Roll Tide," which takes the University of Alabama's football war cry and turns it into a romantic lament.

But what you hear most over the span of the album's 10 songs is joy and camaraderie, from the close relationship between the band members to such friends as Jim James, Jim Keltner, Brittany Howard and Will Oldham, who all make an appearance on "When the Tequila Runs Out," and Mandy Moore and Lucius' Holly Laessig and Jess Wolfe, who pitch in their lovely voices on "Picture of a Man."

"I feel like listening to the record, it's four players who are really in love with each other and want to support each other. Nobody felt like they needed to step out. I don't think we were like that before," Goldsmith says. "It feels like joy. It feels really good."

"What I like most is the risks we've taken. I know we have always taken steps that help us get to the next level even when we don't know where it's going to take us. But we just know that it will take us somewhere. And it has. It's taken us to a place that feels right."
Aaron Embry
Aaron Embry
At the tail end of his three-year stint as the piano player for the Los Angeles ensemble Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros, Aaron Embry finally found the voice for which he’d been searching. He discovered this voice captive in an arch top tenor guitar, a harmonica, and a small stack of moleskin notebooks. Travel-ready and now equipped with his new discoveries, Embry found a current and the songs came up like a flood.

He wrote at a prolific rate while on tour throughout the late spring and fall of last year, a body of songs born among communal, creative atmospheres of life on the road with Sharpe and of time on the rails with the numerous musicians of 2011’s Railroad Revival Tour. As a songwriter, Embry cut his teeth by recording and touring with greats such as Elliott Smith, Willie Nelson, and Daniel Lanois, among plenty of others.

In April 2012 he began recording, and the outcome is Tiny Prayers: a 10-track collection that explores a wide range of emotions while anchored in the cardinal folk tradition of simplicity. Elemental s ong structures and spartan acoustic arrangements bring Embry up close and in focus as a songwriter, singer, and musician. Lyrics such as “Is my happiness dependent on its own design? Am I only waking up to leave my dreams behind?” are evidence of his love for emotional complexity, while his voice and bare instrumentation carve melodies that are built like something low to the ground yet wide as the sky.

Tiny Prayers was recorded at the Embry’s family home in Ojai, CA.

Tiny Prayers is set for release from Community Music in the Fall of 2012.
Venue Information:
Pier A (Hoboken, NJ)
100 Sinatra Drive
Hoboken, NJ, 07030