The Bowery Presents
Bayside & Say Anything

Bayside & Say Anything

Hot Rod Circuit

Tue, May 16, 2017

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

PlayStation Theater

New York, NY

$27, $32

This event is 16 and over

Bayside
Bayside
"Spent all my life/Waiting for a moment to come" - "Killing Time"

Bayside lead singer/rhythm guitarist and founding member Anthony Raneri has been waiting 10 years—since he formed the rock group in Queens, N.Y. in the winter of 2000—to make an album like Killing Time, which represents a number of firsts for the band named after his hometown.

The album is the band's debut for new label Wind-up Re...cords after four releases on Chicago-based indie Victory Records, including Sirens and Condolences (2004), Bayside (2005), The Walking Wounded (2007) and Shudder (2008), steadily growing their following through tireless touring. Recording their latest at Dreamland Studios in Woodstock, N.Y., and Water Music in Hoboken, N.J., with renowned producer Gil Norton [Foo Fighters, Counting Crows, Pixies, Jimmy Eat World], Bayside finally had the time and resources to fulfill their creative vision.

The group turns Raneri's acoustic songs into full-blown, deceptively complex rock epics that touch on bitter endings (like that of his marriage on the first single, "Sick, Sick, Sick," and the angry, full-throttle rocker "The Wrong Way"), fresh starts ("The New Flesh"), band camaraderie ("It's Not a Bad Little War," "Sinking and Swimming on Long Island") and even a hopeful ballad, complete with a 20-piece orchestra and a horn section ("On Love, On Life").

"This is a new chapter, a new beginning for us," acknowledges guitarist Jack O'Shea, who joined the band in 2003 and has played on all five of their albums. "This feels like our debut release. Gil really encouraged us to push the boundaries of what we do, and not to become timid. Having that kind of encouragement from someone so accomplished really gave us the confidence to be more creative."

One can hear that in O'Shea's various guitar sounds, from the Dick Dale/Link Wray surf guitar rumble which opens "Already Gone," to the gnarled, twisted solos in "Sick Sick, Sick" and "It's Not a Bad Little War," to the pneumatic rush of "Sinking and Swimming on Long Island" or the frenetic jam that ends "The Wrong Way."

"We wanted to make a big, detailed record, but still retain the pop sensibility that makes us who we are," states Raneri about the studio process. "Gil helped us stay on an aggressive rock track without losing sight of the music's commercial appeal, its ability to get on the radio. To achieve that balance was the plan."

For Bayside, the rest of its career leading to this moment feels like Killing Time, according to Raneri. "We had the time, the producer, the label to support it and fans who are ready to hear it. Everything was in place for us to make our masterpiece."

Indeed, Killing Time takes everything Bayside has learned in its decade in the music business and puts it on display for all to hear. On "Mona Lisa," another song Raneri wrote about his ex ("Someday, I'll forgive you/But it still hasn't happened yet"), he tried an experiment in writing. "I half-jokingly call it my greatest accomplishment," he laughs. "It was an attempt to write a song with as many chromatic key changes in it as possible, without it sounding like mathematics. I was sure it would never make the album, but everyone seemed to love it."

There are also glimpses of the hard road Bayside has traveled to this point in "It's Not a Bad Little War," a song about being on the front lines and trenches with your bandmates ("We are the only friends we ever had"), and "Sinking and Swimming on Long Island," about all the ones that got left behind ("The harder you work/The harder you fall/You wake up one day/With nothing at all").

"Seeing Sound" has an operatic, almost Queen-like vibe, reflecting Raneri's own love of Broadway show tunes, while the dramatic "On Love, On Life," is driven by piano and acoustic guitar, with pop tunesmiths Bacharach and David and Welsh crooner Tom Jones as the touchstones. The title track shows off the band's metal chops, with ominous Blue Oyster Cult overtones.

"I really think this album has the best elements of all our previous releases," says O'Shea, whose own guitar heroes include metal speedsters like Metallica's Kirk Hammett and Megadeth's Dave Mustaine as well as Slash, along with such jazz-rock muss as Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Allan Holdsworth, Al DiMelola and John McLaughlin. "It's the most representative of what we've always gone for as a band. It encompasses what our fans like best about us."

With 10 songs weighing in at 38 minutes, there is no filler on Killing Time, an album, while not a concept, with songs that are organically connected and of a piece, like Green Day's American Idiot or Nirvana's Nevermind.

"We were trying to make the perfect album," says Anthony. "We've been trying to make this record for 10 years. We finally had all the elements we needed to do it. We wanted these to be the 10 best songs we've ever written."

"Now I don't ask for much/But this could define a lifetime" - "It's Not a Bad Little War"

"Everything has been leading up until right now," says Anthony. "Killing Time is about new beginnings, changes. This is our moment, the album we were supposed to make. A lot of bands that came up with us, we've watched form, get signed, get huge and then disappear. And we're still here…People continue to listen and care. We're living the dream."

On Killing Time, that dream becomes reality.

"We're all just excited about the possibilities of what the next year holds for us," concludes Jack. "We've always approached our career with a cautious optimism. We hope for the best, but we're OK with whatever happens. We roll with the punches…but this time it all seems so much more tangible."
Say Anything
Say Anything
Over the twelve years since the release of ...Is A Real Boy, Max Bemis, the man behind Say Anything, has developed into a revered and mythical character in the alt-rock world. Over the course of releasing four progressive and fan-beloved records, Max has swayed in many different creative directions, but has always maintained a central core based on the band's ethos of "Do Better. Be Better. Or at least have the hope that better exists for you".

Two years after the release of Hebrews, arguably Max's most ambitious and critically-acclaimed album to-date, and accompanying tours with The Front Bottoms and Modern Baseball, Say Anything have returned with the surprise release of I Don't Think It Is (Equal Vision Records). The decision to release the record as a surprise came from Max's admiration for artists like Beyonce and Kanye West whose unique release methods are rarely seen in the rock world. As Max puts it, he had become a bit weary of doing the same song and dance leading up to the actual end-game, people actually listening to something".

In a lot of ways I Don't Think It Is marks a return to the visceral, raw punk that brought the band to prominence in the first place. On the flipside it is also the most collaborative Say Anything record, as Max wrote with Cody Votolato (of the Blood Brothers), Paul Hinojos (of At The Drive In), Christian Holden (of Hotelier) and a slew of others on different tracks for the record. Most notably it was the first time Max had a full collaborator in the writing/recording process, partnering with Darren King of MuteMath, whom he referred to as a "full partner in the production and composition of the record".

Catch Say Anything on tour this spring with MewithoutYou, Teen Suicide, and Museum Mouth.
Hot Rod Circuit
Hot Rod Circuit
Hot Rod Circuit makes music for those times when you feel most alive. Whether that moment is during heartache or while driving down the road, Hot Rod Circuit? Vagrant Records debut and third full length, Sorry About Tomorrow, fits just about any moment it may be needed for.

Hot Rod Circuit have been around for 5 years, steadily winning fans since their inception in Alabama in 1997. The band relocated to the Northeast? indie scene in ?8, initially residing in Connecticut. While releasing two full lengths on Triple Crown Records, the band crossed the US countless times on tours with The Get Up Kids, Jimmy Eat World, Saves The Day, Avail, Hot Water Music and At The Drive-In. Playing 250 shows a year, Hot Rod Circuit fine tuned their live act and soon made the jump to Vagrant Records.

Touring incessantly made them a tighter band, and they took this cohesion into the studio. ?his is the first record we?e made that I? excited to listen to when I get home at the end of the day,?says singer Andy Jackson, adding, ?his is the first release I? truly proud to say I made? And it shows. Sorry About Tomorrow is a step forward for the band, combining melody and technical accuracy with stronger production by Brian McTernan, it is certain to garner them appeal in a more mainstream arena.

Classifying Sorry About Tomorrow into one distinct style is nearly impossible. There are elements of punk, rock and roll, indie, and hardcore all under the umbrella of pop. After only a few casual spins, even the most skeptical listener will be hooked on the moods and textures of Sorry About Tomorrow.

Hot Rod Circuit have already played 150 shows in 2002, and are heading out this fall to play another 30 with Dashboard Confessional and 10 headlining dates. The band will be the first to tell you there? no claims of grandeur in their music, just honesty and the promise of being the soundtrack to your next good time.

"seeing the band live is a life-changing experience"
- Alternative Press

"a stellar assortment of poignant hooks"
- Boston Phoenix

"a winning amalgam of punk and indie rock"
- Billboard

"HRC is earning it? reputation as a phenomenally energetic live band"
- Rockpile
Venue Information:
PlayStation Theater
1515 Broadway
New York, NY, 10036
http://www.playstationtheater.com/