The Bowery Presents
Jamestown Revival

Jamestown Revival

Ghost of Paul Revere

Sun, April 30, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Brooklyn Steel

Brooklyn, NY

$20

This event is 16 and over

Jamestown Revival
Jamestown Revival
The story of Jamestown Revival feels suited for the dog-eared pages of a timeless American novel.

Chapter one opens with Jonathan Clay and Zach Chance meeting in Magnolia, TX at 15-years-old. Fast friends, the duo attended college together, started Jamestown Revival, and traded their home state for Los Angeles, CA in late 2011. By 2014 they released their debut album UTAH (which included the hit single ‘California’), built a committed fan base with countless road shows, and received critical acclaim from the likes of Rolling Stone and The Wall Street Journal. They were named iTunes “Best of 2014: Singer-Songwriter Album of the Year,” graced the sound stages of Conan and The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, and performed at some of America’s legendary music festivals including Coachella, Austin City Limits, Bonnaroo, Bottlerock Festival, and Willie Nelson’s Fourth of July Picnic.

“UTAH opened a lot of doors for us and put us on the road for the first time,” says Zach. “We learned how to play for a crowd and how to perform.”

But when it came time to record a second album, the band found themselves in a different place.

“This album is like chapter two,” agrees Jonathan. “The story begins at the point where we decided to head back to Texas. We wrote many of the songs when we were entering a different phase of our lives. We settled back into Austin, and my wife and I had our first child. That was a big shift. It was all about leaving behind our last bastion of adolescence, if you will.”

This process resulted in The Education Of A Wandering Man [Republic Records], an album that looks back at the journey of the band’s past. The record chronicles the lessons learned and the experiences that color the life-lived along the way.

“This album is a snapshot of our observations and learnings over the past four years. Our education has been gained not in a classroom, but in our experience,” Zach and Jonathan write in a letter to fans announcing the album.

Musically, the record remains loyal to Jamestown Revival’s indie rock/alt country aesthetic while also reaching into new creative territory.

“You can hear all of our influences on the new album. It feels like a late night drive after a show. There’s some Motown, rock ‘n’ roll, and even a little country. We paid homage to a lot of the people we listened to while stuck in a car between gigs,” says Zach.

Tapping into almost a lifetime of natural chemistry, the band started sharing musical ideas while sitting on Jonathan’s porch before holing up in a Hill Country farmhouse a few hours from Austin for recording. Producing themselves alongside longtime collaborator Ryan Lipman, the sessions lasted only two weeks, and Jamestown Revival emerged with 12 new tracks.

“It was a bunch of good friends in a relaxed setting making a record,” says Zach. “It never felt like a nine-to-five. We could have a smoke outside, play horse on the basketball hoop, and hang out and wait for the muse to find us.”

Though the record came together quickly, nailing down the first song proved more difficult. After wrestling to overcoming the pressure, the band emerged with their first single “Love Is A Burden,” kick-starting the creative process.

“We wrote that song about our last single ‘California’,” admits Jonathan. “When we started writing, all we did was compare every song we wrote to ‘California.’ We never thought anything lived up to it, and that started to squelch our creativity. This piece of music that did amazing things for us became like a lead weight. ‘Love Is A Burden’ is about the successes, the failures, the triumphs, and the fears of the past really starting to weigh you down and having a hard time moving on. It’s a metaphor we related to a relationship you can’t move past in the lyrics. As far as inspiration goes, the chorus just popped in my head, and we ran with it. After all of that overthinking, it was done in ten minutes.”

Album opener “Company Man” captures the heartbreak of corporate greed. “My family’s got some land where we birthed the idea of Jamestown Revival, and we’ve both been going there together since we were kids,” says Jonathan. “"One day my family gets a call that there’s an oil company who wants to put a pipeline right through the property. They were doing it under the protection of ‘public domain’. That piece of land is sacred to us, but ironically, nobody else cared about it until there was something to gain.” Company Man speaks to that feeling of helplessness and frustration.

“American Dream” comments on similar themes, while “Head On” explores the claustrophobia of the concrete jungle. Elsewhere, the acoustic-driven “Back To Austin” serves as an upbeat love letter to their hometown. Throughout, the record speaks to themes inherent to the meaning within its title The Education Of A Wandering Man.

“The Education Of A Wandering Man is actually an autobiography by classic western novelist Louis L’Amour,” Zach says. “He traveled the world and lived a fascinating life. Jonathan and I read the book years ago and fell in love with it. It’s like looking back on a life unplanned. That really resonated with us when we were making the album. The more you travel, the more perspective you get. Our travels have been an education.”

For Jamestown Revival, the album is simply a continuation of their ongoing story. “We’ll be writing and telling stories until we’re six feet under,” Jonathan leaves off. “This album is just the next step on the path.”
Ghost of Paul Revere
Ghost of Paul Revere
"Robustly played, masterful amalgamation of bluegrass, folk, and gospel for the Millennial Generation... The Ghost of Paul Revere prove that superior roots music can come from anywhere." - No Depression
"Simply put, this band is one to see live... A gorgeous blend of bluegrass, folk and good old fashioned rock and roll... their performance takes on a boot-clacking brilliance that transforms each song into a full-on participatory event, sending an electric surge about the room that’s near impossible not to feel. Add to that a layered three part harmony coursing through each soulful song, and The Ghost of Paul Revere demonstrated they not only had the chops, but the heart to reach their audience and leave an undeniable impression as well. And as the floorboards shook with each pounding stomp, one thing was certain: the band announced they had arrived, loud and clear." - Dispatch Magazine
"Simply put North is an album that shouldn't be missed. (It will) make even the most callous of individuals feel the unbridled joy of Holler-Folk." - Ear to the Ground Music
"A distinguished sound that only seasoned musicians can usually attain" - Portland Press Herald
"(The Ghost of Paul Revere) stole the show. I was so impressed with them. Their harmonies, stomping percussion, and vocal power were stellar... their songs progressed from mellow to powerhouse... their harmonies are superb and their songs have power." - whatbreesees.com

Born of the waters of the Saco River, brothers in all but name, the Ghost of Paul Revere is Maine's premier holler-folk band. Building their songs around powerful three-part harmonies, energetic performances, and a non-traditional way of interpreting traditional American music. Drawing from a broad array of music including Elmore James and the Beatles, to Tom Waits and more, The Ghost writes powerful songs, built on melody and energy, designed to be performed with passion. From soft folk to foot-stomping bluegrass, the songs have unique identities while still remaining undeniably the Ghost of Paul Revere. Their lives shows have gained the reputation of being some of the best in the Northeast.
The band was formed around childhood friends Max Davis, Sean McCarthy, and Griffin Sherry. They put the Ghost of Paul Revere together in 2011 with Matt Young. In that short time they have played from Fort Kent to New York City in everything from houses, churches, music halls, and even sail boats. Their debut EP North was met with high praise and fanfare. Recorded in late 2011, and release in the summer of 2012, it became the 15th best selling local album in Maine and New Hampshire for 2013 in just 5 months. In August 2013, the group went into the studio with Jonathon Wyman to record their first full length album. Believe will be released on January 14th, 2014.

Believe in the Ghost

Check out a full interview at:
http://www.pressherald.com/life/go/this-ghost-has-a-soft-spot-for-holler-folk_2013-03-28.html?pagenum=full

"North", their debut EP, reached was the #15 best selling local release in Maine and New Hampshire after only 6 months. This is what people have had to say:

The Portland Press Herald:
★★★ 1/2

Based on a four-star scale
Imagine a band with your standard folk and bluegrass roots, then sprinkle in some Americana, hurl in some "holler" and nip it up with nu-grass and stomp. Do all that, and you've got the recipe for the sound of a new band on the scene: The Ghost of Paul Revere. Formed just last year, the band seems to have a distinguished sound that only seasoned musicians can usually attain. This may be akin to the fact that three of the band members are lifelong friends, and their three-part harmonies show off their brethren spirit artfully. "San Antone," the first track off the band's new EP, "North," is a perfect opener. It lulls in the listener with a sweet acoustic guitar melody reminiscent of reflective country blues, which always conjures up good imagery: Hot cactus- and tumbleweed-lined pin-straight highways leading to one's own grandiose oasis. The three-part harmonies of Griffin Sherry, Max Davis and Sean McCarthy introduce themselves right away with a yearning: "I lost my heart in the heat of San Antone/ I found my love in the cold of the Great White North/ I watched my lover roll me over like a river stone/ You've got pain in your bones and you're not alone." The song picks up in tempo as it gallops on, yet stays true to its own individuality throughout. "Grandpa's Chair" is also full of imagery. One may envision a scene out of "The Waltons" as the banjo and mandolin pluck and sway and a harmonica weeps throughout an old house in need of repair, with children running about, dirty little hands being beckoned to wash for supper and a subtle but stern ghost whisper singing (in three-part harmony): "Don't sit in grandpa's chair." The last track, "Spirit," is more rhythmically charged, but I got a little lost when they broke into a cappella at the end of the song, as there was too much pause between the verses. But they then showed off their sense of humor after the song officially ended, with a "hidden track" of them doing some a cappella, off-the-cuff, gospel soul riff of "Spirit.""North" is definitely a very good start for these Buxton musicians. It is hoped, we will be hearing more from them in the near future as their musical identities mature and yearn for even more to ponder, stomp, holler and create.

http://www.pressherald.com/life/go/music-and-nightlife/new-band-from-buxton-something-you-dont-hear-every-day_2012-09-27.html

No Depression:

North, the impressive debut CD of Portland, Maine-based The Ghost of Paul Revere, is an all-too-brief EP of what the band itself has dubbed “holler folk”—a robustly played, masterful amalgamation of bluegrass, folk, and gospel for the Millennial Generation. Over the course of six original songs—from guitarist Griffin Sherry’s earnest, tempo-changing “San Antone” to the gospel stomp of banjoist Max Davis’s “Spirit”—the band joyfully weds three-party harmonies to fresh and bracing melodies. Far from being folk purists—their live sets have included a roots-rock version of Snoop Dogg’s “Gin and Juice”—these guys frequently rock harder than any string band this side of Old Crow Medicine Show, whose “Wagon Wheel” they have also covered. Old-timey music never sounded like this.
“That old tree, it creeks just like your chair,” sings Davison on the gentle tune “Grandpa’s Chair.” “That old tree, it smells like autumn air.” The lyrics exemplify the evocative nature of the music itself, as earthy as it is ethereal, teasing the senses as it conjures up images of dilapidated farmhouses and hellhounds that “hunger for our meat (“Wolves”).” Though young, the members of Ghost seem to understand that darkness and light—a duality that has always characterized the best country and folk music—are mutually dependent, in art as in life. As the late Townes Van Zandt wrote, “There ain’t no dark till something shines,” a truism that obviously is not lost on songwriters Sherry, Davis, and Sean McCarthy, who also plays bass. As the title of the EP suggests, fidelity to a beloved true north emerges as a recurrent theme here. “San Antone,” a paean to place and true love, soars with Sherry’s declaration that “my heart is in the Great White North,” while, in the haunting “Kodiak,” Davis cryptically sings “we’re all heading north.” Sherry, Davis, and McCarthy grew up together in Buxton, Maine—not exactly a hotbed of indie roots music, but who says it has to be? While mountain music is often associated with the Deep South, the songs of Ghost remind us that the Appalachian Trail runs north as well as south. Like The Band, four of whose members were Canadian, The Ghost of Paul Revere prove that superior roots music can come from anywhere.

http://www.nodepression.com/profiles/blogs/the-ghost-of-paul-revere-north

Dispatch Magazine:
When nearly 200 people are stomping their feet in unison to your music, a drummer is probably not an essential percussive component to your band. And for The Ghost of Paul Revere, that just so happens to be exactly the kind of arrangement that works. Last Saturday, the band celebrated the release of their debut EP ‘North’ with a rollicking show at the Empire Dine and Dance that had everyone on their feet, singing, clapping, and most importantly, stomping along to their gorgeous blend of bluegrass, folk and good old fashioned rock and roll.
Simply put, this band is one to see live. And while the record certainly provides an accurate representation of the band, live, their performance takes on a boot-clacking brilliance that transforms each song into a full-on participatory event, sending an electric surge about the room that’s near impossible not to feel. Add to that a layered three part harmony coursing through each soulful song, and The Ghost of Paul Revere demonstrated they not only had the chops, but the heart to reach their audience and leave an undeniable impression as well. And as the floorboards shook with each pounding stomp, one thing was certain: the band announced they had arrived, loud and clear.

http://dispatchmag.com/the-ghost-of-paul-revere-celebrate-the-release-of-north/
Venue Information:
Brooklyn Steel
319 Frost Street
Brooklyn, NY, 11222