The Bowery Presents
of Montreal

of Montreal

Foxygen, French Horn Rebellion

Tue, December 11, 2012

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Webster Hall

New York, NY

$22 advance / $25 day of show

This event is 18 and over

of Montreal
of Montreal
“A golden despondency” is how Kevin Barnes translates the meaning behind Aureate Gloom, the title he gave of Montreal’s thirteenth full-length album.

The oxymoron is one Barnes says best describes the overall state of his life and mental outlook while working on the record: first on a writing retreat in New York City, then while demoing tracks in Athens, before finally recording at Sonic Ranch, just across the border from Juarez, Mexico in the Texan desert.

If you’re wondering what exactly would lead Barnes to use this epithet to describe his reality at the time, look no further than the songs themselves.

While many bands rely on vague platitudes as an attempt to make their songs universally applicable, Barnes chooses to take the opposite tact — penning lyrics so personal they sound like entries ripped from a journal that should be permanently kept under lock and key.

“I was going through a very stormy period in my life and felt like I was just completely trashed,” reveals Barnes. “I might be guilty of sharing or exposing too much of my private life, but to me the best albums are those that help people connect with an artist on a deep, human level and that do so without too much artifice or evasiveness.”

For inspiration — and to put a bit of distance between himself and the events and people he writes so unequivo- cally about — Barnes spent two weeks in New York City this past spring. While there, he wandered around Chelsea, Greenwich Village, SoHo, and Chinatown, imagining what it was like 40 years ago, picturing himself as Tom Verlaine or Patti Smith, or James Chance.

Lead single “Bassem Sabry” (named for the Egyptian journalist who died tragically in the spring of 2014), is perhaps of Montreal’s most political song to date, with Barnes proclaiming “Every leader is a cellophane punk,” while hand- claps and danceable drums incite the listener to follow his command: “If you hear me, say ‘Yeah!’ ‘Yeah!’ ‘Yeah!’”

The energy remains high for “Last Rites At The Jane Hotel,” which channels Barnes innermost T. Rex while staying true to of Montreal’s signature kaleidoscopic song structure.

“Empyrean Abattoir” begins dark and brooding before unfurling into a revved up Television-inspired outro, as all the while Barnes lays bare his most gut-wrenching lyrics.

Closing track “Like Ashoka’s Inferno Of Memory” ends the record on an appropriately epic note, reveling in its seem- ingly effortless shifting of tempos and tones — a microcosm, really, of the overall album’s auditory audaciousness.

Like 2013’s Lousy with Sylvianbriar, Aureate Gloom was recorded directly to tape with musicians Kevin Barnes (guitar, vocals), Clayton Rychlik (drums), Bob Parins (bass), Bennett Lewis (guitar), and JoJo Glidewell (keys), plus the help of engineer Drew Vandenberg.

Having already spent many of the previous months touring together, the strength of the members’ musical rapport was instantly apparent. The group completed nearly a song a day during their stay in the desert and even wrote a brand new track on the spot, “Apollyon Of Blue Room,” whose title references a supposedly haunted bedroom in a hacienda on the studio grounds.

Working at such a breakneck pace, there was no time to nitpick, to dissect, to overanalyze. Only later, upon arriving back home, was Barnes able to take a step back and fully appreciate what he and his band had accomplished.

With Aureate Gloom, of Montreal have created one of the most unflinching, confessional and starkly emotional albums in their oeuvre.
Foxygen is the bi-coastal songwriting duo of Sam France (vocals, Olympia, Wash., 22 years old) and Jonathan Rado (guitar/keyboards, NYC, 22). They are the raw, de-Wes Andersonization of The Rolling Stones, Kinks, Velvets, Bowie, etc. that a whole mess of young people desperately need. They create a sometimes-impressionistic, sometimes-hyper-real portrait of sounds from specific places and times. Yet, it never comes across as anything but absolutely modern music. They bring the manic, freewheeling qualities of an artist like Ariel Pink to those aforementioned influences to make for one of the most refreshing listens of the year. They are the real deal and total savants. Their albums are love letters to vinyl collections. Jagjaguwar is proud to share with you Foxygen's bedroom masterpiece, Take the Kids Off Broadway.
French Horn Rebellion
French Horn Rebellion
"French horn is hard to play. Making hot beats is fun. Let’s make a band."

Love Is Dangerous in the big, bad city where late nights always bring out swingers on party patrol, hipster suits in dark alleys, beat-boxers at street corners and Poster Girls with Broken Hearts. It's Friday Night, baby and French Horn Rebellion's dance card is Void and Fancy Free.

FHR is Robert and David Perlick-Molinari, two Brooklyn-based brothers born and bred in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In 2007, while hanging on a heartstring and daydreaming of Beaches and Friends, Robert had been playing French horn in the Chicago Civic Orchestra, got restless and decided to turn all attention to making dance music. After informing his conductor that Mahler isn’t fun anymore, Robert asked bassoon-toting older brother, David, to share this epiphany of self-emancipation. Our sordid tale of French Horn Rebellion's mission to deliver NextJackSwing to The Body Electric begins here.

Explains Robert, "We were trying to think of a way to engage kids who play in orchestra or band, and say, 'Hey. You guys can have fun too and this is how you do it.’ That's when the wheels started turning - we could make music the way we want to, and it’s OK."

David offers, "We realized that we had the power to create something of our own. The rebellion was about accepting wholeheartedly the uniqueness of who we are and using that as a driving force. We had to rebel against the status quo and focus on what drove us internally."

These self-proclaimed band geeks gone wild (BGGW) are often Up All Night crafting witty, hook-laden grooves, making reverent noise or Dancing Out on tour with a program of disco-etched lights, hi-octane special guests and a keg full of party-starter anthems. It's the French Horn Rebellion creed. "Could we really be having This Moment?" The answer is an explosive and resounding "Hell, Yeah!" FHR effortlessly weave between the seams of buzzy indie dance, electro, funk and psychedelia through to visceral new wave, rock and ambitious pop. David and Robert's sly productions, smart songs and giddy live shows manage to infuse their devoted disciples with a compulsive and joyous energy.

As FHR's resident pied piper, Robert concedes this bit of affable insight, "I play French horn really, really loud. That's the number one thing - live and loud! We're running around and ripping off Jimi Hendrix solos on French horn. It’s the equivalent of a pizza party in band class with Teddy Riley on the jukebox."

David's practical wisdom believes "Our rebellion is about getting the true, everyday meaning of being alive and forcing the bull-s**t out!"

French Horn Rebellion fan favorites like "Girls," "Caaalifornia," "Last Summer," "Johnny Smash," "Swing Into It" or the band's inspired cover of The Human League's perennial classic, "Don't You Want Me" continue to cement their NextJackSwing global takeover aspirations in the studio and on the road.

“Next Jack Swing is a genre we’ve created from the ‘New Jack Swing’ or ‘Swing Beat’ tradition of the late 80’s and early 90s, but using today’s technology to make the beats heavier, with funkier bass lines, and of course, putting in our own flair..." begins Robert with a knowing, mischievous tone. David finishes the missive, "...It's New Jack's kid brother seasoned by sweaty, basement dance-rages of eternal groove. It exposes everything we love about dance music!"

FHR traveled 5 continents from Seoul to Caaalifornia in search of the best collaborators and fellow champions of the swing. The group have been fortunate enough to work, play, perform and collaborate with some of the best and most influential artists around, such as MGMT, Of Montreal, Ghost Beach, Cut Copy, Yelle, Savoir Adore, Hot Chip, St. Lucia, Jody Watley, The Drums, Two Door Cinema Club, HAERTS, The Knocks, SebastiAn, Autograf, Viceroy, OMD, The Knocks, MNDR, Ladyhawke and Database. Fueled by the group's bounty of wily beats and superbass, The Perlick-Molinari brothers are also very involved with incorporating inspired art, film and visuals to aid and interpret their sonic assault. FHR sleeve, tour poster, cover art and video clips have featured the work of Flekz, Skip Dolphin Hursh, Ronnie Heart, Michael Komar, Jose-Maria Norton, Kristen Winter, Dress Code, Harry Fellowes, Ally Lindsay, Meredith Dittmar and the guys themselves.

Over the years, French Horn Rebellion's emotive pop singles, illustrious dance e.p.'s, well-tailored remixes and an acclaimed album debut, "The Infinite Music of French Horn Rebellion" have received high praise, acclaim and obsession by such media hubs as: The Huffington Post, Billboard, BBC Radio 1, Entertainment Weekly, Jay Z's Life & Times, Interview Magazine, Spotify, Rolling Stone, VIBE, The Guardian, Bust, Mashable, Thissongissick, NY Daily News, VEVO, Q Magazine and Time Out. Additionally, FHR have had 10 self-released singles and mixes storm the top of the influential Hype Machine chart.

With their new record label, Ensemble Records enjoying a glorious bow this Summer introducing Slaptop's smash "Sunrise" (in conjunction with +1 Records) and a busy Williamsburg-based production compound and studio, YouTooCanWoo, churning out the hits, The Perlick-Molinari brothers of French Horn Rebellion are living their D.I.Y. manifesto to the fullest, noting the best is yet to come. It's clear that the group's engaging performer, A&R chief and French Horn-toting label honcho, Robert - partnered with David, the introspective studio geek, world domination enthusiast and production perfectionist, are gearing up for an international rebel party coup. FHR know You're All Right and want to assist with a bit of exclusive party intel.

David knowingly states, "A way the world can feel worthwhile is for its individuals to lead the charge. We are all worth the time and energy. This dance party is where we celebrate!"

Robert breaks it down even further, "I equate orchestra players with middle-class workers. You play the music on the page, listen to the conductor and go home. And I think orchestra players aren't appreciated, much like today's working man. That's why it's a rebellion: working guys, rebel!”
Venue Information:
Webster Hall
125 East 11th Street
New York, NY, 10003