The Bowery Presents
Caveman

Caveman

Lucius, Pure Bathing Culture

Wed, April 10, 2013

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Webster Hall

New York, NY

$17.00 advance / $20.00 day of show

This event is 18 and over

Caveman
Caveman
Caveman-a five-man vibe collective from NYC-released their first album in 2011. As first albums go, CoCo Beware was something akin to a moody statement of intent, a blueprint for a band quickly learning how to create horizon-wide rock songs that were equal parts intimate and expansive. Initially self-released and later snatched up by Fat Possum for re-release in early 2012, the record brims over with four-part harmonies, crystalline guitar lines, and tracks that see-sawed between echoey lullaby ("A Country's King of Dreams") to shoegaze-by-way-of classic-FM-radio sprawl ("Old Friend"). The album quickly elevated Caveman from local band to watch to a sizable touring draw and formidable live act, as evidenced by stints on the road with the likes of The War on Drugs and Built to Spill. Despite being the work of a brand new band, CoCo Beware displayed a kind of Zen-like ease. It was the sound a five friends settling into a nice groove; the music that happens when, for whatever reason, a lot of seemingly disparate elements finally fall into place.

On their self-titled sophomore album Caveman stretch their legs in a number of different, albeit cohesive, directions. While the dreaded second album experience tends to be fraught for many bands, in the case of Caveman it proved to be the opposite. Having ridden a fast-growing wave of support for CoCo Beware-which, after two years of touring, ultimately culminated in a series of big hometown NYC shows-recording a follow up proved to be a genuine good time for the band.

"We all went up to Jimmy's grandmother's place in New Hampshire," says singer Matthew Iwanusa. "That's where the new record kind of started. It was literally the attic of her barn, lit up by Christmas lights. We'd all sit in this one room together and one by one we'd all go into the bathroom and record ourselves making the most psycho noises possible. It actually felt kind of like a weird breakthrough. We were all confident and comfortable enough with each other to try out these experiments, which extended itself into the making of the new record...which is really just an evolution of this vibe that we'd been cultivating for long time."

With that, the guys holed up in Brooklyn's Rumpus Room to start recording in earnest with Nick Stumpf (who produced the band's debut album) and Albert Di Fiore behind the controls. They routinely turned out all the lights in the studio and "vibed out the space" while recording, which makes sense given the warm, big room feeling that saturates the record. The album is a kind of sonic microcosm-a series of emotional yet tough mini-narratives operating within the same quixotic musical universe.

It's fair to say that the songs on Caveman benefited from a solid year of touring on the band's part. "We really learned how to play together," says keyboardist Sam Hopkins, "the shorter songs from the first record got longer and longer when we played them live. We learned how to stretch ourselves in different ways." As a result, the guitars on Caveman are bigger and more expansive, the rhythm section is tighter and more adventurous, the keyboards more opaque and pronounced. Like a marriage between Tangerine Dream, late period Slowdive, and Lindsey Buckingham, tracks like their new single "In the City" and "Ankles" boast synth lines that sound simultaneously retro and futuristic, while "Pricey" and "Never Want to Know" overflow with guitar sounds that could have miraculously floated off an old Cure album. (It should be noted that James Carbonetti, the band's primary guitar player, also happens to be one of the most highly regarded guitar makers in New York City.) And while Caveman's music could certainly operate on the level of dreamy soundscape and still be excellent, the depth of feeling in front man Matthew Iwanusa's lyrics helps weave the songs deeply into your memory. As is the case with many a band on the rise, the price of popularity often comes at the surprise expense of everyone's own personal life; a topic that fuels many of the record's best tracks. When Iwanusa sings Where's the time to waste on someone else's life? on "Where's the Time" it's hard not to read between the lines. Wonder and regret seem to fuel the record in almost equal measure.

"We all got so close since the making of the last record," explains Carbonetti, "Eventually it was like all of our lives were kind of blending together and several of us found ourselves going through the same kinds of struggles in our personal lives. We also realized that we all kind of loved each other-that we'd passed the friend test-and that we all just wanted to hang out together all the time, basically. All of those feelings eventually bled into the record we ended up making."

The words "dreamy" and "cinematic" and "vibe" might be some of the most lazily overused descriptors in the music-writers lexicon, but it's hard to think of another contemporary band that so completely embraces those terms as both an adjective for what they do and as a goal for the art they are trying to make. "A lot people don't relate to the idea of cinematic music-something that sounds like a film soundtrack-but I love that notion," says Iwanusa. "I love music that conjures a mood, sets a tone, and inspires a certain kind of visual. I hope people can get that from this record: a sound that accompanies this big ship flying through the trees, this big, crazy light that just fills up the sky."
Lucius
Lucius
Lucius knew from the start they were on to something special. Centered around the powerful voices and compelling songwriting of Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig, the Brooklyn band has evolved from a promising duo into a dynamic quintet whose 2013 debut LP WILDEWOMAN (Mom + Pop) is lauded by The New York Times as “an art school take on girl group soul.”

Hailed by The Boston Globe as “the most welcome addition to pop music this year” WILDEWOMAN ¬¬has landed on numerous critics’ year-end best of lists. Ranked #25 by Amazon, admired by Paste for its “strong song structures, substantive lyrics and precise playing” and included in NPR’s top 50 albums of 2013, Lucius pairs the synchronous vocals of Wolfe and Laessig, who play synth and keyboards, with guitars and drums from Dan Molad, Peter Lalish and Andrew Burri. Together, they make music that evokes classic girl-group pop and iconic rock ’n’ roll with a modern twist, that belongs solely to Lucius. But none of it happened overnight.

“We’ve been singing together for almost nine years,” Wolfe says. “We never wanted to rush anything. We never looked for a record deal before it felt like we needed one, and we never wanted to be on tour until we felt like we could sustain ourselves on the road. It was important for us to hone our craft.”

Wolfe and Laessig met in college in Boston, bonding over a love of old-school soul, David Bowie and the Beatles. They sing as though each is one half of the same voice, with riveting, resonant unison parts on songs like “Hey Doreen,” the propulsive first single from WILDEWOMAN; and harmonies that feel instinctive as their voices diverge and then meld together on the ineffably catchy title track.

“We started singing in unison because we were always drawn to doubled vocals on recordings,” Wolfe says. “We figured it couldn’t hurt to try it in a live setting and it just felt like our voices were supposed to be sitting together – an automatic vocal kinship. In truth, many of our intentional decisions, when it comes to sounds and arrangements and even band setup, have been happy accidents.”

After their initial musical gathering, the pair started writing songs together, exploring a sense of otherness that each had felt growing up, and pairing it with arresting musical arrangements: from bright acoustic guitars and heartbroken vocals to layers of irresistible rhythm and bold melodies.
“Jess and I have shared unusually parallel experiences,” Laessig says. “We were both bullied during adolescence, which lit a fire in each of us. We have both experienced relationships and love on a similar timeline, so when we write songs together we have a natural empathy. The themes that run through this record reflect the struggles and realizations of becoming an adult, and of being a bit of an outsider sometimes, but embracing it. I think that’s something people can relate to.”

In 2007, Wolfe and Laessig moved to Brooklyn’s Ditmas Park, taking up residence at the Bromley House, which had, unbeknownst to them at the time, been a music school and recording studio for more than 60 years prior. Wolfe and Laessig established an open-door policy for the strong local community of musicians. First came Molad, a drummer, producer and engineer whom Lucius sought out for some early recording sessions (he also co-produced WILDEWOMAN). He introduced them to Lalish, his former bandmate in the indie-pop trio Elizabeth and the Catapult. Later, Molad met Burri while working on a different recording project, rounding out the Lucius family.

At the same time, Lucius was developing the memorable visual look the band employs onstage — “dressing the sound,” they call it. Taking inspiration from strong visual artists, and citing Bjork, Bowie, Warhol and Prince as style icons, the women are bedecked in a seemingly endless array of identical head-to-toe ensembles, complimented by the men’s sharp, tailored style.

Fresh off a year of acclaimed performances and rave reviews, Lucius’ steady ascent shows no signs of retreat. 2014 brings Lucius to a worldwide audience with WILDEWOMAN’s release in Europe, the UK, Australia and Japan (PIAS, March 2014), plus tour dates throughout the UK and Europe, appearances on some of the biggest U.S. summer festivals and more.
Pure Bathing Culture
Pure Bathing Culture
Daniel Hindman and Sarah Versprille began writing songs together in 2009 while living in Brooklyn, NY. In 2011, the duo packed up their lives, moved to Portland, OR and realized that it was time to put a name to the batch of songs they'd been working on -- Pure Bathing Culture was born. Through various serendipitous connections, multi-instrumentalist and producer Richard Swift (Secretly Canadian) heard their early demos and immediately invited them to record with him at his National Freedom Studio in Cottage Grove, OR. The fruits of this recording session comprise their self-titled EP, an elegant collection of four beautiful songs, constructed with smooth melodies embodying the nostalgia of soft soulful 80s pop but with a freshness all of their own.
Venue Information:
Webster Hall
125 East 11th Street
New York, NY, 10003
http://www.websterhall.com/