The Bowery Presents
Americanarama Festival of Music featuring Bob Dylan & His Band / Wilco / My Morning Jacket

In Association with JAM Productions

Americanarama Festival of Music featuring Bob Dylan & His Band / Wilco / My Morning Jacket

Ryan Bingham

Fri, July 26, 2013

Doors: 4:30 pm / Show: 5:30 pm

Pier A (Hoboken, NJ)

Hoboken, NJ

$75.50

This event is all ages


NO PUBLIC PARKING WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR THIS EVENT.
Click here for transportation options to and from Hoboken


Prohibited Items:
Weapons of any kind
Illegal Substances
Backpacks
Outside Food & Beverage, including Alcohol
Glass containers of ANY kind
Bicycles, Skateboards, Scooters or personal motorized vehicles
Fireworks and Explosives
Laser Pointers
Instruments
Blankets
Chairs or Lawn Furniture of any kind
Beach/Golf Umbrellas
Coolers or Picnic Baskets
Pets (except service dogs)
Video equipment - no video recording will be allowed
Professional still camera equipment (no detachable lenses, tripods, big zooms, or commercial use rigs)
Audio recording equipment
No illegal vending is permitted
1 Bottle of Factory Sealed Bottled Water and/or 1 empty water bottle - Will Be Permitted Per Guest

Rain or Shine

Bob Dylan and His Band
Bob Dylan and His Band
Wilco
Wilco
After seven studio albums, various collaborations and countless days on the road over the past 15 years, Wilco tried something new before starting work on its eighth record, The Whole Love, due Sept. 27 on dBpm Records: The Chicago band took a vacation. Staying off stage for most of the latter half of 2010 was the longest break from touring that bandleader Jeff Tweedy has had in a career stretching back more than 20 years.

“It was a real breath of fresh air,” says Tweedy, the singer, songwriter and guitarist who founded the group in the mid-’90s. “Wilco has pretty much been recording in between scheduled tours for 15 years or more, so it was really great to have a chance to recharge and forget how to play all the old songs.”

Or, more specifically, to put the old songs out of mind long enough to write some new ones. Although he wasn’t out on the road much, Tweedy was working, writing so many songs that the musicians initially thought they had enough material for two new records when Wilco reconvened last fall in the Loft, the group’s Chicago recording studio.

“We entertained the idea of finishing both of those records independently of each other, and then at some point, the lines started getting blurrier and blurrier and they kind of grew together,” Tweedy says.

The result is 12 stunning songs that showcase Wilco in a new light, on bold rockers, somber acoustic ballads and punchy pop songs, bookended by the propulsive 7-minute opener “Art of Almost,” and a meditative 12-minute closing track, “One Sunday Morning (song for Jane Smiley’s boyfriend).”

The Whole Love is the third album by Wilco’s present lineup, which solidified in 2004 when avant-garde guitarist Nels Cline and guitarist/keyboardist Patrick Sansone joined Tweedy, founding bassist John Stirratt, drummer Glenn Kotche and keyboardist Mikael Jorgensen. Together, they released the acclaimed Sky Blue Sky in 2007 and the Grammy-nominated Wilco (The Album) in 2009. The Whole Love, though, captures the vibrant energy the band brings to its live performances.

“This record happened because we’ve been together longer,” Tweedy says. “Because we’ve played more shows together, because we have a lot more faith and trust in each other, and it sounds more natural than the last two. You just can’t fake that, you can’t make that happen, it’s experience.”

Experience also pushed Tweedy further as a lyricist, something he credits to letting his mind wander away from the band’s extensive back catalog while writing new songs.

“I feel really good about the way the songs have all come together, and the lyrics especially,” he says. “I don’t feel like I’m repeating myself, which is the best I think you can hope for after writing, I don’t know, a couple thousand songs.”

Tweedy produced The Whole Love with Sansone and Tom Schick (Rufus Wainwright, Norah Jones, Ryan Adams). The singer describes a deeply collaborative process as the musicians worked together to shape Tweedy’s songs into reflections of their considerable talents.

“There’s just a lot of patience involved in how we’re able to work together as a band of guys who have been in bands for a long time and have made a lot of records,” Tweedy says. “I think we’re very fortunate to be relatively mature as a rock band in our ability to be patient with each other and with the songs themselves.”

Patient, but not too patient.

“The environment of the band is as much conducive to people feeling invested and having their ideas entertained as you can have in a band without just spending the rest of your life micromanaging every little decision by committee,”
Tweedy says. “We’d still be working on A.M. if that was the way it worked. We’re talking about a fucking three-chord pop song: Just finish it, you asshole. Christ.”

The Whole Love is the first album Wilco is releasing on its own dBpm Records, which the band founded earlier this year with headquarters in Easthampton, MA. Anti- distributes dBpm, which debuted the first single from the album, “I Might,” b/w a droll cover of Nick Lowe’s “I Love My Label,” in June at the second-annual Wilco-curated Solid Sound Festival at MASS MoCA (the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art) in western Massachusetts.

The new album is the latest step in the ongoing evolution of Wilco, which Tweedy founded in 1994 after the dissolution of his previous group, alt-country standard-bearers Uncle Tupelo. From its raucous roots-rock origins, Wilco over the years has expanded its sound to encompass classic pop and genre-spanning experimentalism. Wilco also teamed with English singer Billy Bragg in the late ’90s at the invitation of Woody Guthrie’s daughter, who invited them to collaborate on setting to music some of the folk icon’s previously unrecorded lyrics, resulting in a pair of highly regarded Mermaid Avenue albums.

Although Wilco has accrued critical acclaim from the start, the band in the ’90s increasingly found itself at odds with its record company, Reprise. Wilco proved willing to compromise on 1999’s Summerteeth, but the relationship fell apart in
2001, when the label declined to release Yankee Hotel Foxtrot and dropped the band. Nonesuch stepped in to release Yankee Hotel Foxtrot the following year, and the album has since become Wilco’s top-selling effort so far. (The making of
Yankee Hotel Foxtrot is the subject of Sam Jones’ 2002 film I Am Trying to Break Your Heart.) Wilco recorded three subsequent albums for Nonesuch, including 2005’s Grammy-winning A Ghost is Born, before the band decided to start its own record company.

Though dBpm (which stands for “decibels per minute”) has changed the business end of the band’s operation, the creative end remains largely untouched.

Since Summerteeth, “We’ve gone back and gone about things almost exactly the same way every time, and that is, at the end of the day, we want a record we’re really proud to put on our shelves and know that we did the best that we could do,” Tweedy says. He laughs and adds, “And fuck ’em. Now it’s the same thing, except there’s really no one to say ‘fuck ’em’ to. Just ourselves.”

In addition to launching Solid Sound and dBpm with Wilco, Tweedy also produced Mavis Staples’ Grammy-winning 2010 album You Are Not Alone. Outside Wilco, Stirratt and Sansone lead folk-pop group The Autumn Defense, Cline fronts the free-jazz instrumental group The Nels Cline Singers, Jorgensen helms pop-rock band Pronto and Kotche performs solo, in the duo On Fillmore, and has collaborated with Tweedy in Loose Fur.

Wilco will spend most of the autumn on tour, and audiences will get to fall in love with songs from The Whole Love starting Sept. 13 in Indianapolis and continuing with a European jaunt that begins Oct. 24 in Glasgow.

“We’re all really excited and really proud of it and really happy with the way it came together,” Tweedy says. “I think everybody in the band feels like they were given more free rein to do what they want to do. I think everybody enjoyed the process of making this record.”

Wilco are: Jeff Tweedy – guitars, vocals; John Stirratt – bass, vocals; Glenn Kotche –drums, percussion; Nels Cline – guitars; Patrick Sansone – guitars, keyboards, vocals; Mikael Jorgensen – keyboards, vocals

Wilco discography:
AM (1995)
Being There (1996)
Mermaid Avenue (1998)
Summerteeth (1999)
Mermaid Avenue Vol. II (2000)
Yankee Hotel Foxtrot (2002)
A Ghost Is Born (2004)
Kicking Television: Live in Chicago (2005)
Sky Blue Sky (2007)
Wilco (The Album) (2009)
The Whole Love (2011)
My Morning Jacket
My Morning Jacket
“The new record, Circuital, is named after the title song,” explains Jim James, of My Morning Jacket’s sixth studio album. “On that song I sing about ending up in the same place where you started out. And that makes a lot of sense for this album… I hate the phrase ‘going back to our roots’, but for this record we came home and made it in Kentucky. And it just felt a lot like it did when we were first starting out...”

My Morning Jacket formed at the tail-end of the 1990s, when Jim James’ group Month Of Sundays folded, and he began recording new songs with ex-members of local rockers Winter Death Club. At Above The Cadillac Studios – in reality, a shed on the grounds of guitarist Johnny Quaid’s grandparents’ farm – the group took shape, drawing upon their rich knowledge of classic rock, country, soul and psychedelia, and spinning these influences into fresh, life-affirming rock’n’roll and aching, haunting balladry. My Morning Jacket made their early reputation off the three sublime albums they recorded at Above The Cadillac – 1999’s The Tennessee Fire, 2001’s At Dawn and 2003’s It Still Moves – and legendary live shows that proved here was a truly magical group for the ages. It Still Moves marked a move to the major labels for the group, while its heavy touring cycle prompted the amicable exit of Quaid and keyboardist Danny Cash from the ranks.

Album number four, 2004’s Z, was a brave step outside of the group’s comfort zone, recorded in New York’s Catskill Mountains with the aid of respected producer John Leckie (Stone Roses, Spiritualized), and with new members guitarist Carl Broemel and keyboard player Bo Koster making their debut appearances on tape, their skilful performances swiftly proving themselves cut from the same cloth as their bandmates. The album also saw James stretch his song-writing chops beyond the familiar reference points of My Morning Jacket’s earlier work, an impulse he furthered with 2008’s Evil Urges, which scattered the group’s ragged rockers and tender, keening ballads with subtly sensual grooves and tracks that sounded like heavy metal laced with psychedelic soul and feral funk. Both albums helped grow ever-swelling following, a grass-roots movement that’s spread like wildfire in the wake of their many long and glorious tours, and already-legendary shows like their 4-hour 2008 Bonnaroo head-lining performance, which captured one of the world’s greatest rock’n’roll groups at their most masterful and alive.

Circuital is the first album the group have made in Kentucky since It Still Moves, recording it in the gymnasium of a Louisville church under the aegis of producer Tucker Martine. Jim bonded with Martine while recording backing vocals for Laura Veirs’ 2010 album July Flame, which Martine, Veirs’ husband, also produced. “We hit it off right away,” says Martine, who later helped set up a home studio in James’ Louisville home, where he’s working on a future solo album. “As a group, we’ve always been hoping to find ‘our guy’,” says James. “And we’ve worked with some great people, but we’d wanted to find someone who was, like, ‘one of us’. And Tucker fit in perfectly, and he had a whole set of skills we didn’t possess. He’s real smart, and fun to be with.”

Converting the gymnasium into a recording studio wasn’t an easy task, says Martine, but the extra effort yielded unique results. “It’s a big project, to record in a space like that. It has so many limitations, compared to working in a modern studio, but they were limitations we were all drawn to. The focus became on communicating and interacting, and not on what modern trickery we could use later.” At the group’s insistence, the album was recorded live, with few overdubs;
James’ vocals were recorded at the same time as the band’s performances. “We were going for full takes; we wanted everybody running back to the control room afterwards, freaking out and wanting to listen back to the take,”remembers James. “We’re A Band, and so I want our records to be made that way, with us being A Band. Capturing performances, that intangible thing between us, some kind of soul. When friends have been through as much as we have together… It’s not something I could even describe. We wanted to capture the sound of us just playing, being in the same place and just feeding off each other.”

“This is truly a great band, and they play so well together, it would be wrong not to document that,” adds Martine. For James, the new album finds a sweet understanding between the questing creative impulses of Evil Urges and the more familiar feel of My Morning Jacket’s earlier work. “The album’s like a rolling, gentle soundwave,” he says, in comparison to Evil Urges’ jagged edges. “But I don’t feel Circuital sounds like our earlier recordings. We’re always trying to go in new directions.” His memories of the sessions for Circuital are only fond. “There was no AC, no-one had their laptops. We recorded everything on tape. It was like, we’re just who we are, with what we have with us at the moment, and that’s all we have. It was a beautiful thing, and it really cemented what we all mean to each other, as people and as a band. We’ve learned, slowly over the years, how to function more healthily, I guess, so we don’t all combust. Making this record, it felt like our friendship was only strengthened.”
Ryan Bingham
Ryan Bingham
For some artists, winning an Oscar would represent reaching a pinnacle. For Ryan Bingham, who took home the Academy Award for "The Weary Kind," his hauntingly beautiful theme song for the acclaimed film Crazy Heart, it instead represented a crossroads and a decision about which path to take.

"When there are a lot of people around saying 'look, you have to capitalize on this and do something really commercial,' you might think about it for a second," admits the LA-based singer-songwriter. "But at the end of the day, there's not a chance in hell I could do that. It made me sick to my stomach just thinking about it. I couldn't get up in front of people and play a bunch of stuff that didn't mean anything to me."

Bingham puts that philosophy to the test in a big way on Junky Star, his third album on Lost Highway, which was recorded in a matter of days with producer T Bone Burnett, his collaborator on the Crazy Heart soundtrack. The disc delivers a bracing fusion of pensive, gravelly ballads - like "Hallelujah," which is not a Leonard Cohen cover, but his own take on mortality, delivered from the other side of the veil - and raw, rock'n'roll cuts that showcase Bingham's incisive, darkly compelling lyrical bent.

Bingham channels a number of unique spirits over the course of the album, leading with his sensitive side on "The Poet" and kicking out the jams on the Waylon-meets-Keith Richards "All Choked Up Again." Elsewhere, as in songs like "Depression" - a vivid evocation of our current social climate that'd have Woody Guthrie nodding in approval - and the album's poignant title track, Bingham applies his wizened rasp with precise strokes, wringing emotion from every note.

"I've always been passionate about the situation of homeless people and kids having to survive on the streets, so some of these songs come from that, from looking at what people need to do to survive," he explains. "So Junky Star doesn't have anything to do with drugs or anything like that, it's more about finding the beauty in what might at first appear to be rough around the edges. You can see that beauty in someone on the street, like some guy just raving and be like 'I wonder what this guy has been through to get to that place?'"

The same might be said for Bingham himself. Born in New Mexico and raised all across the Southwest, he set out on his own at a young age, shuffling from town to town looking for a place to sleep between rodeos, day labor, and a weekly gig at a no-frills local bar.
That spirit infused Bingham's Lost Highway debut, Mescalito, which won kudos from media outlets as varied as Rolling Stone, Esquire and The Washington Post - the latter noted "anyone seeking to invent a modern-day Texas troubadour couldn't do better than to replicate Ryan Bingham's life story." Indeed, the disc opened many illuminating windows into the soul of a man who, despite still being in his twenties, had already done plenty of living.

Those experiences served Bingham well, earning him more critical acclaim for 2009's Roadhouse Sun, a disc that prompted Billboard to defer comparisons to forebears and note "Bingham's not a 'new' anything: He's his own man, and a singular talent at that." That's high praise indeed, but the opinion was shared by plenty of the singer-songwriter's musical peers, including T Bone Burnett, who he collaborated with on the soundtrack for Crazy Heart.

"The director gave me the script, but after not hearing from him for a couple of months, I thought I had fallen off the radar," he recalls. "When I got 'The Weary Kind' over to him, everything happened really fast from there. It was a lot of fun getting the opportunity to work with guys like T Bone Burnett, Stephen Bruton and Jeff Bridges."

As a result of their collaboration, Burnett wasted no time in getting into the studio when Bingham had a set of songs together. Without using the usual session superstar suspects, the album was recorded with Bingham's long-time band The Dead Horses. "He was hip to the fact that we wanted it to be just us from the start, and he didn't want to change what we were doing, he just wanted to help us get that down," says Bingham.

"We didn't need a horn section or a string section or anything like that. We wanted to keep it simple and track these songs live. We were able to record the album in three days because the band already knew the songs, so we just went in and did them the way we'd been playing them."

That immediacy is reflected in the power generated by each of Junky Star's dozen tracks, from the sparse slow-burner "Yesterday's Blues" to the anthemic statement of purpose "The Wandering." In the nooks and crannies of these songs, along with the rest of the album, Bingham's outspoken philosophy and the band's raw energy create the sort of perfect musical storm that promises to rattle plenty of cages that deserve a good shake-up, both musically and socially.

"None of us need a hit single or be famous rock stars," he concludes. "Just to be able to make a living playing music and not having to work an eight to five job digging holes makes me feel fortunate enough. I see so many kids living on the street or going off to Afghanistan, so I don't feel comfortable saying
Venue Information:
Pier A (Hoboken, NJ)
100 Sinatra Drive
Hoboken, NJ, 07030