The Bowery Presents
M. Ward

M. Ward

Yo La Tengo, Wyatt Cenac (of The Daily Show)

Tue, August 7, 2012

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 7:00 pm

BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! Festival

Brooklyn, NY

$35 advance / $37 day of show

This event is all ages

Benefit concert to support free programming at Celebrate Brooklyn! a Performing Arts Program of BRIC Arts | Media | Bklyn.

Rain or Shine

M. Ward
M. Ward
M. Ward returns with a stunning new album, More Rain, for release on Merge Records on March 4, 2016. Ward has released a string of acclaimed solo albums over the past several years, along with five LPs with Zooey Deschanel as She & Him and a 2009 collaborative album with My Morning Jacket’s Jim James and Bright Eyes’ Conor Oberst and Mike Mogis under the moniker Monsters of Folk. In addition to his celebrated work as a musician, Ward is an accomplished producer, handling those duties for such luminaries as Mavis Staples, Jenny Lewis, and Carlos Forster as well as his own musical projects.

M. Ward knows how to live with rain. Having spent the last decade-and-a-half based in the perennially damp Portland, Oregon, the singer-songwriter and producer has learned how to shine through the soggy gloom by simply embracing its inevitability. For Ward, there is inspiration in a dark sky and harmony in foreboding winds. And with his new album More Rain, he has made a true gotta-stay-indoors, rainy-season record that looks upwards through the weather while reflecting on his past.

“I think one of the biggest mysteries of America right now is this: How are we able to process unending bad news on Page One and then go about our lives the way the style section portrays us?” says Ward. “There must be a place in our brains that allows us to take a bird’s-eye view of humanity, and I think music is good at helping people—myself included—go to that place.”

This album, Ward’s eighth solo affair, finds the artist picking up the tempo and volume a bit from his previous release, 2012’s A Wasteland Companion. Where that record introspectively looked in from the outside, More Rain finds Ward on the inside, gazing out. Begun four years ago and imagined initially as a DIY doo-wop album that would feature Ward experimenting with layering his own voice, it soon branched out in different directions, a move that he credits largely to his collaborators here who include R.E.M.’s Peter Buck, Neko Case, k.d. lang, The Secret Sisters, and Joey Spampinato of NRBQ. The result is a collection of upbeat, sonically ambitious yet canonically familiar songs that both propel Ward’s reach and satisfy longtime fans.

More Rain begins with an actual rainstorm, then throughout the album, guitars chime, chug, and riff with Ward’s unmistakable earthy tone, while layers of atmospheric reverb and skittering drums climb and clip in equal measures. As the cloud of noise rolls in, the layers part ever so slightly to make way for Ward’s voice, which can play wispy and whimsical in one moment (“Pirate Dial”) or crackling and smoky in the next (“Time Won’t Wait”) just as well as it can climb to clear-sky clarity (“Confession”) then drop down to smooth, soulful crooning (“I’m Listening”), each one after the other. “Girl From Conejo Valley” is a nostalgic trot through people he used to know and a place he used to be, and “Slow Driving Man” is sweeping and lush in its orchestral climb towards confident heights.

As the album ends with the self-assured swing of “I’m Going Higher,” voices join together in a chorus of rising “ah”s and, for just a second, it seems the storm outside has slowed, making room for a ray of hopeful sunlight. As Ward knows, the rainy season is sure to return, but for now, More Rain is here to help us with our perspective.
Yo La Tengo
Yo La Tengo
Yo La Tengo’s uninterrupted 30-years-and-counting career is unparalleled in its creative breadth and refusal to rest on laurels. Ira Kaplan, Georgia Hubley and James McNew have enjoyed success entirely on their own terms – playing the world’s best concert halls, museums, and dives, collaborating with everyone from Homer Simpson to Ray Davies, from Chris Elliott to Yoko Ono, portraying the Velvet Underground in I Shot Andy Warhol and composing scores for Adventureland and the films of Jean Painlevé, and even creating a holiday tradition unto themselves with their series of Hanukkah shows at Hoboken, New Jersey’s legendary club Maxwell’s, from which they’ve donated hundreds of thousands to charity.
Wyatt Cenac (of The Daily Show)
Wyatt Cenac (of The Daily Show)
Wyatt Cenac was born in New York City. After three years of big city life he had enough and moved to Dallas, Texas. Missing the big city life, Wyatt moved to North Carolina. After four years, he realized he got on the wrong plane and moved to the big city of Los Angeles where he would spend the next bunch of years doing comedy and getting into debt.

While in LA, Wyatt spent three seasons as a writer on FOX's animated show "King of the Hill" and also did stand up at shows like "Comedy Death Ray" and "The Tomorrow Show." To avoid his debt collectors, Wyatt spent most of his time performing at the Upright Citizens Brigade and Improv Olympic, where he did shows like "Rap Crisis Center," "The Armando Show" and did a regrettably terrible Barack Obama impression that found its way onto the Internet. In 2008, Wyatt starred in the film "Medicine for Melancholy" which was nominated for three Independent Spirit Awards and lost all three (Thanks a lot, "Synecdoche, New York").

Wanting to return to the big city he gave the finger to as a toddler, Wyatt moved back to New York in 2008 to join the news team of "The Daily Show" as a correspondent and writer. He forgot how cold it gets in the winter.

Wyatt’s one hour stand-up special “Wyatt Cenac: Comedy Person” aired on Comedy Central last year.
Venue Information:
BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! Festival
Prospect Park West and 9th St.
Brooklyn, NY, 11217
http://www.bricartsmedia.org/performing-arts/celebrate-brooklyn
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